Tuesday, 28 April 2015

Return to the Ripple



Do you find that sometimes you just need to take a step back and do something simple yet satisfying. This week I returned to doing the ripple pattern using a pack I bought from The Little Wool Shop in Thurles, Co Tipperary.

This picture shows you a simple diagram of the pattern and how it is made up.



To begin you need to decide whether you would like your piece to have tight, small ripples as shown in the diagram or  wider spaced ripples as in the completed sample.

The principle is the same for any size ripple you wish to make. The amount of stitches BETWEEN the increase at the peak of the ripple and the decrease in the valley of the ripple determines the size of each repeat.

In the diagram I have used 3 tr between the increase and the decrease therefore I need six chains to make one side of the ripple (going down) and another six for the other side (coming back up). So each pattern repeat calls for 12ch.

1 chain for the increase, (1)
1ch for each of the three tr's, (3)
2ch for the decrease, (2)
2ch for the next decrease, (2)
1ch for each of the three tr's, (3)
1ch for the increase, (1)
Total of twelve chains per repeat.

So lets assume we want a finished piece with three repeats, our starting chain will be calculated as follows:
Three repeats @ 12ch each = 36ch.......+ 3ch (turning chain) = 39ch to begin.

The actual blanket I am making (in the next picture) has 10 st's between the increases and decreases, therefore using the same principle as above each repeat has the following number of st's:

1 chain for the increase, (1)
1ch for each of the ten tr's, (10)
2ch for the decrease, (2)
2ch for the next decrease, (2)
1ch for each of the ten tr's, (10)
1ch for the increase, (1)
Total of twenty six chains per repeat.

So once again lets assume we want a finished piece with three repeats, our starting chain will be calculated as follows:
Three repeats @ 26ch each = 78ch.......+ 3ch (turning chain) = 81ch to begin.



Row 1: As seen in the diagram (at the top of this post) I have started with a turning ch of 3. I placed a tr into the fourth chain from my hook and made my first increase (Turning chain + tr into the fourth ch = first tr increase). Into the next three chains I have placed 1 tr into each of them. Using the next two chains I have made a tr decrease. 
Now we reverse the pattern to go back up, so, 
Using the next two chains I have made a tr decrease. Into the next three chains I have placed 1 tr into each of them, and I make two tr's into the next ch (increase). Repeat across the chain until you reach the end. Your final ch should have the last increase made into it. Ch3 and turn.

Row 2: Make a tr into your first st (under the ch3) (first increase made), work one tr into the next three tr's from the previous row, tr2tog over the next two sts (X2), work one tr into the next three tr's, work two tr's into the next tr (X2).....repeat to end omitting the second increase at the end of your last repeat.

Repeat row 2 until you have reached your desired length.

To add some interest you can work into the back loop only on all stitches which will give a ridged effect to your ripples although I do reccommend to work into he full stitch at the beginning and end of each row to give a stronger edge to your blanket.

UK Tr crochet increase Click here of video tutorial.
UK Tr2tog (decrease) Click here for a video tutorial.
US Double crochet into the back loop only Click here for video tutorial. 
(This video uses US terminology for the double crochet. This is the same stitch as a UK treble crochet)




I will add some more to this post as the blanket increases. Hope you have fun making it. x

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